I’m in Daaawg heaven! Oil painting demo… How to paint a Dog…

I was looking for an article I had written when I came across this demo I did a while ago and thought I would share it with you again. This time I have it step by step so you can follow the progress.

Here’s a photo of Montana, I love his beautiful smile! I used some artistic license to create a playful element and a pleasing composition.

I began with a 11″ x 14″ canvas I primed with 3 coats of Gesso and sanding lightly when completely dry. Not too smooth as you want to have some tooth for the paint to adhere to.

Montana On my easel

Next, I tinted the canvas with burnt umber thinned with oms, applying it with a brush.

Burnt Umber paletteTinting my canvas

Then smooth it off with a neatly folded rag. If you bunch up your rag, it will leave marks on your canvas.

Smoothing it out

Next I drew in Montana with a brush and Burnt Umber thinned with very little oms. Stay as dry as possible.

Drawing of Montana

Once drawn in, I begin filling in all the darks with a mix of Burnt umber and Ultramarine blue thinned with a little oms, still being careful not to over-saturate your paint with oms.

Adding darks

I mixed Ultramarine blue with a dash of transparent red oxide, plus white for the blue skies and for the clouds, I mixed some white with a grey I made with transparent red oxide and Ultramarine blue. For the lights I mixed white with transparent red oxide and a tiny dash of Ultramarine blue.

Montanas palette1

The colors I’m using for this painting are; Transparent red oxide, yellow ochre, Ultramarine blue, Burnt umber, Titanium white Alizarin and cadmium red.

Once I had laid in my darks, I filled the background with blue skies and clouds, placing Montana on the beach, his favorite place to be.

Blue skies

I painted in the yellowy brown colors above and below Montana’s eyes. I mixed Transparent red oxide with yellow ochre. To darken the mixture I added some burnt umber.

Montanas progress1

I then added the blue grey markings on his forehead and nose and blended the fur with the white color which is Titanium white with a dash of transparent red oxide and tiny dash of ultramarine blue and grey.

Montanas progress2

I then painted Montana’s eyes with Transparent red oxide, a dash of blue and burnt umber. Next, for his tongue, I mixed a dash of cadmium red, grey, alizarin and white with a teeny dash of yellow ochre and white. The grey I refer to is a mix of transparent red oxide and Ultramarine blue.

Montanas progress3

Next I painted in Montana’s teeth with some transparent red oxide, a dash of yellow ochre and white.

I premixed my greys. Actually I always premix all my colors, it’s much easier in the long run even though it takes quite a bit of time preparing my colors, it still saves me time and hassle in the end. For the browns in the fur I mixed together some transparent red oxide with yellow ochre and a dash of burnt umber.

Montanas progress4

I mixed some titanium white, a tiny bit of transparent red oxide and a tiny dash ultramarine blue and a tiny dash of yellow ochre for the white fur; to which I ad a dash of gray made up of burnt umber and ultramarine blue. It’s a little tricky working the dark and the light fur without greying the black. I used a clean brush with every stroke from black into the white fur so that I didn’t grey any of the black fur. I left little bits of the underpainting showing through and that warms it up from the inside out.

Hope you enjoyed the progress picks and how I develop a painting.

Montanacompleted

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Teacups and Roses underpainting….

Another day closer to spring,  I’m so excited! I can’t wait to get my flower and veggie garden going. I’ll have tons of subject matter to paint, outside, my favorite place to be in the summer.

I completed my drawing and will be mixing some neutral grays to work on the underpainting. I filmed the drawing session and will be filming the process of mixing grays and how I made my value finder.

When I set up my still-life, I couldn’t find the right paper for the background, so I found an image of roses I liked and painted it into the background, really going for the look of  wallpaper. The rose lasted all of one day, so really had to improvise. So back to my palette, I have some grays to mix. I’ll be filming and explaining my process every step of the way right up to the very last brush stroke.

Have a wonderful day and happy painting!

Teacups and Roses underpainting

Teacups and roses drawing ~ Detail

Did you know that the Secret is in the grays?

Yesterday I spent the day setting up my new still-life and prepping my canvas. Today I’m going to be drawing in my image. I usually have two approaches to painting; direct painting, or indirect painting. For this one I decided to go with indirect painting. I begin with an underpainting and layering.. I actually find this approach pretty sound and would recommend it before direct painting, especially if you are a beginner. I realize some would argue the point, but in my own personal experience, direct painting is way more challenging. Once my underpainting is complete, I’ll mix up a set of grays and begin mixing color. I’m going to be filming the entire process from the drawing to the very last highlight. Teacups and roses is my subject matter. I’m excited! I love this still-life and look forward to sharing my process with you!

Did you know that the secret is in the grays? I’ll be filming how to mix the perfect gray and how to use grays and why you need them.

Have an Excellent day and Happy painting!

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Launching my brand new website soon!

I’m so happy we’re in February, this means spring is approaching, that excites me!

I’ve been working like crazy on my brand new website that I’ll be launching in the next few weeks. I’m working on a set of how-to videos for those of you who are wanting to know how to paint a still life in oils and learn about the art of color mixing. I know so many struggle with color and seeing values. Oil painting can be very tricky, and unless you know what you are doing, you will continually struggle. In my experience, the first place to start is with Values before you even begin using color. I really wish I knew then what I know now, because I would be way ahead if only I began with the basics instead of trying to get ahead of myself with concepts way beyond my understanding.  This is why I decided to work on these videos and help those overcome the same struggles I had learning the Art of Oil Painting.

Wish you a fabulous day and happy painting!

Burnt Umber palette

 

Today’s progress on Montana the pooch…

Blue skies

I worked until 11pm, I’m done, tired, but I did promised I would load my progress by the end of the day. It’s the end of the day and here it is :- )

The colors I’m using for this painting are; Transparent red oxide, yellow ochre, Ultramarine blue, Burnt umber, Titanium white Alizarin and cadmium red.

Once I had laid in my darks, I filled the background with blue skies and clouds, placing Montana on the beach, his favorite place to be.

Montanas palette1

I mixed Ultramarine blue with a dash of transparent red oxide, plus white for the blue skies and for the clouds, I mixed some white with a grey I made with transparent red oxide and Ultramarine blue. For the lights I mixed white with transparent red oxide and a tiny dash of Ultramarine blue.

Montanas progress1

I painted in the yellowy brown colors above and below Montana’s eyes. I mixed Transparent red oxide with yellow ochre. To darken the mixture I added some burnt umber.

Montanas progress2

I then added the blue grey markings on his forehead and nose and blended the fur with the white color which is Titanium white with a dash of transparent red oxide and tiny dash of ultramarine blue and grey.Montanas progress3

I then painted Montana’s eyes with Transparent red oxide, a dash of blue and burnt umber. Next, for his tongue, I mixed a dash of cadmium red, grey, alizarin and white with a teeny dash of yellow ochre and white. The grey I refer to is a mix of transparent red oxide and Ultramarine blue.

Montanas progress4

 

Next I painted in Montana’s teeth with some transparent red oxide, a dash of yellow ochre and white.

I premixed my greys. Actually I always premix all my colors, it’s much easier in the long run even though it takes quite a bit of time preparing my colors, it still saves me time and hassle in the end. For the browns in the fur I mixed together some transparent red oxide with yellow ochre and a dash of burnt umber.

Tomorrow I’m hoping to complete the rest of the fur and then finish off the final touches!

 

Painting Montana the Pooch…

I recently received a commission to paint Montana, the adorable pooch. Unfortunately he is no longer with us :- (

I’m posting my process with progress photos to show I how develop a painting. The easy way!

Here’s the photo of Montana, I love his beautiful smile! I used some artistic license to create a playful element and a pleasing composition.

Montana On my easel

I began with a 11″ x 14″ canvas I primed and sanded smoothly. Next, I tinted the canvas with burnt umber thinned with oms, applying it with a brush.

Tinting my canvas

Then smooth it off with a neatly folded rag. If you bunch up your rag, it will leave marks on your canvas.

Smoothing it out

Next I drew in Montana with a brush and Burnt Umber.

Drawing of Montana

Once drawn in, I begin filling in all the darks with a mix of Burnt umber and Ultramarine blue.

Adding darks

Tomorrow I continue filling in color with more progress photos. I’m excited!

I must admit, I do prefer the direct painting approach…

How I love to wake up in the morning and head straight into my beautiful garden. Everyone’s happy, fertilized, watered and growing as I await in anticipation for the magnificent summer display of blooms and butterflies. I can’t wait to walk through my flower garden and pick fresh blooms to paint. I’m so excited!

I will be spending much time this summer in my garden painting en plein air. There is nothing more exciting than painting outdoors with such a vast array of subject matter. Come on summer!!!

Back in my studio, I’m working on many underpaintings all soon ready for color.  I must admit, I do prefer the direct painting approach. I find the gray underpainting somewhat monotonous and boring, although when it comes to adding color, it gets exciting again. Once these are done and out the way, I will be very relieved and stick to direct painting in future.

I know that there are those learning this method and who are intrigued by the glazing process. I will post some images and perhaps an iphone video of how I go about applying color, glazing and scumbling. My palette is a gray tile and the colors I use for my underpainting is Titanium white and Raw umber. My initial drawing is done with just Raw umber. I like to leave some of the warmth showing through in some areas.

underpainting

 

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Chopin plays his piano and soothes my soul…

It’s a beautiful morning on this first day of March. Although it looks like rain on the way, there is such a beautiful light flooding through my window. I moved my studio upstairs. I don’t know why I didn’t do this sooner. The attic room was purple, but not for long. I painted it a dark sage green. The colour of ambient atmosphere. Perfect for painting people and still from life. I’m so fortunate to have this space in this north-west facing room.  The window light is more than enough light for painting. The natural light is way more uplifting for my spirit. Chopin plays his piano and soothes my soul while I write, sigh…

Here’s an image I took with my iphone of my studio. I love this space. I can close the door and shut the world out while I paint and swoon over the most beautiful music that touches my muse in such a profound way.

my new studio

In reply to your question, Felta, about how I set up a portrait sitting. How long a sitter sits and how much do I get done in one sitting.

I have two windows in my studio. I sit with my back facing the one window, so the window light falls on the canvas on my easel and palette. The sitter sits near the other window. Generally I like a two hour sitting, although I can manage an hour if the sitter falls asleep and needs to go home for a nap. Two of them fell asleep sitting for me yesterday hahaha!

Rolf's portrait

In this image, the sitter, Rolf came over to sit for his portrait quite late in the day and the light began to fade. I turned on a 5000k light and faced it up towards the ceiling. The light bounced off the ceiling and created the perfect light for my sitter. The first sitting took a few hours. This time was spent drawing his face with my brush on a canvas I stained with a wash of burnt umber the day before. I used burnt umber for my drawing. The second sitting was an hour and half. Half the time was spent laying in shadows and searching for the correct colours. I found the right mixes and made notes. The third sitting was in my new studio. An hour, Rolf fell asleep, lol, he had a long day at work, standing all day cutting hair. My studio is so peaceful. I have the most beautiful view overlooking a gorgeous Zen Garden David created. An old blue and gray house in the neighbors yard and the trees behind the house looks so inviting. I am definitely going to paint this view. Soon.

The colours I use for flesh tones are as follows, but first remember this, although we all have our own skin tone recipes, they are never written in stone. Skin tones differ and also depends on what surrounds the skin. Light and colour illuminate the skin. Our skin is like a mirror that reflects everything around it. Here are a few recipes I picked up from Daniel Greene, one of my favorite portrait painters. I found his mixtures to be pretty spot on. I like to premix some of my colours, especially when time is of the essence.

Raw Sienna + Cadmium red light. This is for the reds in the half tones and the hot reds in the shadows.

Chromium oxide green. I’ll explain how I use this colour…

Look at your hand. Hold your had sideways like this.

My hand

Notice that as the light begins to turn to shadow there is a green colour and then the hottest colour is right where the shadow begins. Right next to the hottest colour is green and then the shadow is made up of the ambient colour of the room . You can see it closer to my thumb.  If you notice the top left side of the image, the folds between my thumb and forefinger are red and then surrounded with a subtle green. Notice the green surrounding the indentation.  You will also notice the yellow colour of my skin in the light. Yellow Ochre + White and a dash of purple, I made up of Alizarin Crimson and Ultramarine blue. Always think complimentary colours when you paint skin tone. I use Chromium oxide  Green and the Raw sienna and Cadmium red light mix for the shadows. For the deepest shadows I mix Sap green + Alizarin. Two transparent colours. You want to keep your shadow colours thin. Always tone down your reds with green. Always tone down your greens with red and that includes pinks too, as that is made from reds. Always use complimentary colours to tone down the intensity and Nothing else. For pinks I use Burnt sienna + white. For orange tones I use Burnt Sienna + Yellow Ochre. Always tone down your yellows with purple. Nothing else. Remember, Yellow Ochre is a yellow. I also mix up a pile of Transparent red oxide and Ultramarine Blue for my darks. Transparent Red oxide + Burnt sienna with a dash of blue + White makes a great base for skin tone too. It all really depends on the sitter’s skin tone and the ambient atmosphere. Alizarin and Viridian make a beautiful dark colour for shadows in the the background too. I also sometimes use Viridian in skin tones too, it really depends on the skin tone of the sitter.

As I mentioned in previous posts, make up colour charts of the colours you use. You can’t go wrong. If I don’t know what combination of colours to mix to arrive at a certain colour, I use my colour charts. It’s fail-proof.

skin tone colour chart

Hope this helps, please feel free to ask any questions should I have missed anything.

Good luck and happy Painting!

A successful painter once told me to never be satisfied with mediocrity…

Wow, now that the crazy rush is over, well almost. I can get back to planning the year ahead. I have a few projects on the go. One of the projects involve painting a collection for a fund-raiser. More of that to come later as it develops. I plan to paint more prolifically this coming year. One thing I do intend to take part in, the practice of a one hour, tonal study from life as a warm-up to start the day. I find this practice excellent for self discipline and improves one’s skill over a short period of time. One of these days I’ll film a demonstration to show how easy this is and how much pleasure one can derive from it :- )

The best way to progress as a painter~ is to paint. A lot. Every day. The more you practice, the better you get. There are no hidden ‘Secrets’ or shortcuts to painting beautifully. One cannot put an apple in a blender and expect grape juice. What you put in, is what you get out.  A successful painter once told me to never be satisfied with mediocrity. Always push yourself further than your capabilities. Challenge yourself with the most difficult parts first and when you have that down, challenge yourself even further.

Currently on my easel is the first of several paintings for a fundraiser I’m taking part in. More to come on that.

Happy painting :- )

Stan on my easel1

My Studio is now Chemical-free…

Last night was spent endlessly coughing. I didn’t sleep. My lungs have had it with chemicals. No more turpentine. Its over between us! My studio is now chemical-free.

Thank god for Virgil Elliot. An expert in the field of Oil paint and Mediums. He has found a safe alternative for this very hazardous profession. Safflower oil for Clean-up. Here’s an article he wrote on this very subject…

“All the natural resins have their drawbacks as ingredients in oil painting mediums, and increase the likelihood of problems developing at some point in the future. The most permanent paint films result from the simplest mixtures of linseed oil and pigment. I am less leery of alkyds than I am of damar, mastic or copal, if for some reason I feel a need for a resin in my paint. I find I can paint every bit as well without resins as with them. Our health will suffer less if we can find a way to keep the air in our studio free of solvent vapors. When the paint contains no resins, safflower oil and a rag will suffice for cleaning brushes while one works, and for that matter, afterwards, if it is followed with soap and water. I use different brushes for different colors, and do not clean brushes until I’m done painting for the day. Not only does that keep me from breathing harmful vapors, it keeps my colors cleaner in my paintings.”

Virgil Elliott

My favorite Oil painting Medium recipe…

Woke up with a head cold yesterday. Today I don’t feel to wonderful. My mood is touch and go. I want to work on my painting, but I can’t focus right now. I cannot create anything feeling like crap. So instead I’m going to ‘Oil Out’ a few paintings. One of them being ‘Amanda’s Tea Party’. When the over-all tone of your painting is uneven and some of the darks have sunk in, ‘Oiling out’ evens out the appearance of high and low spots on the surface of the canvas. The best way to resolve this is with cold pressed linseed oil. Obviously make sure the paint is dry to the touch. With a soft brush, apply a thin layer of linseed oil, then using a cheesecloth rag, wipe the linseed oil off immediately, leaving a very thin film. There have been some concerns about linseed oil yellowing ones painting. However, there is a phenomena that will reverse the yellowing ~ exposure to day light.

For painting medium I use:

4 parts Walnut oil

I Part Stand oil

2 Parts Gamsol Odourless Turpentine

Combine the ingredients and stir until dissolved. Don’t shake, you don’t want bubbles.

You don’t need much, just a few drops. It’s best to use a dropper and mx into your paint thoroughly with a palette knife. Using too much medium will compromise the paint film and weaken it. Use very little, just enough to improve flow.

This afternoon I have intentions of working on the Mayor, I’m pretty happy with my progress. I’ve managed to match his skin colour perfectly. I’ll paint his hand next and demonstrate how I do it and the colours I use. Next, the Mayor’s shirt. A white shirt with thin blue stripes. I’ve been considering how to tackle this for a while now. This is a challenge I enjoy taking on. If it were easy, it would bore me. I considered painting the whole shirt white and then add the stripe. However, I don’t think I want to do that. I want a more painterly feel. So I’ll finish the shirt as I go along. Hmmm, here goes….

How to set-up an Oil Painting Studio…

Setting up an Oil painter’s studio can be a costly affair. It doesn’t have to be. In this Article I give you the basics of setting up your studio, how to make your own easel and how to organize your space. I cover the paints and brushes and mediums I use.

To learn more about Oil Painting, I have 10 half hour video series on how to paint a portrait Get your Free Portrait Painting video series here!

I posted a short one minute video on how to mix a fleshtone for a portrait and that Video can be found HERE

Feel free to join us on The Oil Painter’s Studio Facebook Group and get in on all the awesome Videos, Tips and Lessons on everything Oil Painting!

Hope you enjoy the article and if you have any questions, feel free to ask!

photo 3 (2)

Studio

This is a basic set-up with a north facing window. I bought this easel for under $250. I added the wheels so I can easilly move it around. A table for my palette and brushes. In this set-up, extra lighting is not really necessary. Some aren’t so lucky and need some kind of lighting set up to paint.

Lighting

lighting skylight

Lighting is everything. I assure you, I have researched this subject thoroughly. I have tried Every type of lighting on the market. Some Artists are fortunate enough to have a north facing window, this would be an ideal lighting condition, However, some aren’t so lucky. The alternative, 5000k natural daylight. This is inexpensive and I’ve seen all sorts of companies trying to pass off studio lighting for way too much money. I was able to get mine at a fraction of the cost. I am fortunate enough to have a skylight in my studio, however on dark cloudy wintery days, I switch on my panel light, it’s like a skylight without a skylight. It’s best to mount it as high as possible at a 35% angle to prevent glare.

The reason for the 5000k light, is it is the truest light form you can paint to. The colors on your palette and on your canvas remain true. Anything else would be too yellow or orange or blue and can alter the illusion of color and you will end up with a painting that can’t be viewed in any other lighting. If you show your work in an outdoors show, your colors would be off, guaranteed, been there, got the T-shirt. I use this light, it’s pure white, neither yellow nor blue.

lighting

Easel…

Although I love my floor easel, I also designed and made my own wall mounted easel with a slider. You’re welcome to copy my design. I also mounted a stick at the top of my easel on which to rest my hand. If you have a floor easel on casters, I suggest you place it on a rubber mat so it doesn’t move.

Shabbychicstudioeasel attachment

Chest of Drawers…

This is ideal for placing your computer monitor, your brushes and jars of turpentine/medium, whatever you use.

Studio setup

In the top drawer I have placed my colors in a row all along the width of the drawer. This way I can easily find the colors I need. The next drawer down I keep paper towels, rags etc. Next I keep paperwork, receipts, notes and drawing pads.

Palette, brushes, paints and mediums

wall mounted palette

I mounted my palette onto the wall next to my easel. then I mounted a piece of glass I tinted with burnt umber and white.  Here’s an article I wrote on how to tint your palette.  How to tint your palette and why you should

Brushes, I use Mightlon, they’re great brushes for an affordable price.  They hold their shape beautifully and last longer.
Oils, I’m fussy, I love Old Holland classic oils, high quality, the best I can afford. Feels good to work with, smooth and never disappointing.

Mediums. I can’t handle the smell Turpentine. Which means I can’t use Damar crystals. Too hard on the lungs for me, being asthmatic doesn’t help. FYI, Damar crystals do not dissolve in odorless turpentine or Gamsol.
For medium I use Walnut oil and Stand oil and Gamsol’s odorless mineral spirits. It takes a while for Stand oil to dissolve in oms, so give it a week or so to dissolve. Stir, never shake.

Paper towel and clean-up.

I prefer to use paper towel instead of rags to clean my brushes and for turpentine use. This way I can discard the paper-towel and not have turpentine soaked rags under my nose. I also find that the cheapest brand or even recycled paper towel is best. No lint. Avoid the big fluffy rolls of paper towel.

Even though one can’t smell the odorless Mineral spirits, it is still a chemical and is still dangerous. I paint and handle all chemicals and oils with disposable gloves.
A fan is really needed, always have the fan on when using chemicals and a window open is ideal. Vacuum and clean your studio often to rid of dust. Nothing worse than dust and animal hair on your freshly primed canvases or freshly glazed painting.

My favorite brush cleaner is Turpenoid. I can’t live without it. The best ever! It will even clean off hardened stiff brushes, it’s amazing and totally Non-toxic!

Good luck with setting up your studio and happy painting :- )

For those of you who are learning how to paint in oils… Get your Free Portrait Painting video series here!

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Every time I paint, I learn something new…

Making some excellent progress with Ta’Kaiya’s painting. So delighted with how it’s turning out. The progress is slow but sure, I don’t really know what i’m doing :- / I’ve never painted a close up of foamy waves lapping the shore. But i’m definitely hooked and want to paint an ocean scene only in burnt umber using the wipe-out technique. Such a beautiful colour. The experts say to take it off our palettes because of it’s ‘sinking in’ phenomena. However, I do believe there are ways around that. Use it on it’s own and ‘oil out’ with a mix of damar, stand oil and turpentine at the end.  Damar is a resin, similar to a clear coat, but varnishing a final coat can be done a year later if one feels it’s necessary.

Now to get back to my painting, I can’t wait to work on it some more… so exciting to learn how to paint ocean water rushing over the sand.

A Little flesh tone Lesson

It’s Thursday morning, listening to Mark Farina’s Mushroom Jazz, very mellow tunes, great painting music. Truth in position, Mushroom Jazz 4

Today’s going to be a little lesson on painting flesh. I’m still working on Emma and going to be painting her ankles and feet. She’s sitting on a rock on the beach and the reflection of light on her skin renders a slightly blue purple color on her skin. She’s a red-head and has very fair skin too. The rocks she sitting on, will be darker shades of blues and purples with light reflecting from the sky, sunlight and water. The orange u see, is the under-painting.

The base color for flesh is Ultramarine blue and Burnt Sienna plus white. So mix up a pile. To warm it up add a dash of Transparent red Oxide. This is a very strong pigment, so just a tiny bit at a time. For the tender flesh areas, add a dash of lemon yellow to the base color.

Mix up a pile of  Permanent Alizarin and ultramarine blue to cool the flesh tone down mix in the purple-blue color to the base, really depends on the light. For dry brush scumbling I use a pink mixture of permanent alizarin plus white to give the skin it’s luminosity. The tips of the toes are going to be a red pink tone because of the blood flow. For the veiny area add a little lemon yellow with a hint of green into the flesh base.

I use a mix of burnt sienna and ultramarine blue for my darks and also a dark mix of Viridian and Permanent Alizarin.

Now I’m set and ready to paint. I begin with the shadow under her right foot, then paint in the red areas on the soles of her foot with Transparent red oxide, cad red and Alizarin mixed in with some flesh tone.  On the lighter tones I added a dash lemon to the flesh and the pink red tone on the top of her foot is a little cad red and alizarin mixed into the flesh base. I used lemon yellow for highlights. I blended the shadow color under the foot and painted in some of the surrounding rock.

I wanted this foot to kind of blend in with the background as it’s not part of the focal point. So subtlety is the key. Any questions, please feel free to ask.

Palette colors and mediums

My palette colors are as follows…

Lemon Yellow, Pale Yellow, Cadmium yellow medium, Yellow Ochre, Cadmium Red, Transparent Red Oxide, Cad orange, Permanent Alizarin, Burnt sienna. Viridian, Cobalt Blue, Ultramarine blue and Titanium white.

The medium I use is  Stand oil  mixed with oms.

I part Stand oil and 5 part Oms. It generally takes a week or so for the stand oil to thoroughly dissolve with the oms, it’s very thick and will eventually mix. Patience. It’s wonderful medium to use.

Color charting…..

Don’t u just hate it when u want to rework a painting and u cant remember what colours u used? Now I document every colour I use for  every painting. Yes a colour chart really works. I find them very useful, saves me a ton of time. When designing a painting, I simply use my colour charts to map out my painting and the colours I’ll be using. If I’m not sure of a colour, it’ll be on my colour chart for sure. How simple is that! I’ll give u an example. I’m sitting at my easel staring at my still life I set up in my studio and cant put my finger on the colour. I simply hold up my colour chart to match the colour I need. I mix it up and viola! If I could give u very sound advise, the colour charts will save you so much hassle over and over again. You want a short cut? This is it. It may take you a week to make these colour charts, but in the long term, it’s use will be worth it’s weight a hundred times over in gold and time.

Here’s an example, close up of how i made these color charts. As u can see it is well used.